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  1. ITV Report

Period Poverty is being tackled across the Channel Islands

1 in 10 women in the UK cannot afford sanitary products Credit: ITV

People across the Channel Islands have been part of a push to tackle period poverty.

Period poverty refers to a lack of access to sanitary items due to financial constraints.

It is estimated that pads and tampons cost more than £18,000 over a woman's lifetime.

1 in 10
Women across the UK cannot afford sanitary products.

Students at The Ladies' College in Guernsey have been making hygiene packs for girls in Tanzania.

1 in 6
Students miss school in Tanzania because of their period.
Girls and their female family members are making reusable sanitary items at The Ladies' College in Guernsey Credit: ITV Channel TV

The packs include handmade pads made from cloth which comes from donated fabrics which are '100% reusable, 100% washable in cold water, light to carry, easy to wash and quick to dry'.

These kits will last for two to three years. What we make don't look like what they are... we have used materials that are dark so there's less staining and also to use things that are pretty and feminine, the girls love these.

Each kit provides the girl with exactly what she needs to live a normal life and to control that aspect of growing up.

– Sarah Jane Allen, Hygiene Project Coordinator for Guernsey

In Jersey, the Red Box Project aims to tackle the local problem by providing schools in the island with donated sanitary products.

Many girls are forced to miss school when they have their period because they risk feeling embarrassed and in some cases cannot afford sanitary products.

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The idea is to get a small red box in each primary and secondary school with sanitary items that young girls can ask either a pastoral member of staff or a teacher that they trust to support them to get those items, so it basically means if someone does start a period during the school day or they’ve started before they arrive they can get items they need so they can stay in school and not miss out on their education.

– Steffy Bechelet, Volunteer Coordinator at Redbox Jersey

Guernsey girls and young women can use the 'Hey Girls' scheme which operates on a 'buy one, give one for free' structure to help to support girls and women who cannot afford sanitary products.