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  1. ITV Report

Culls carried out to reduce number of feral chickens in Jersey

Residents have complained about being woken up early, damage to gardens and being chased by the birds Credit: Fabian Sommer/DPA/PA Images

Culls are being carried out to control the number of feral chickens in Jersey.

Residents have complained about being woken up early, damage to gardens and being chased by the birds.

It is believed the chickens were once pets, which were abandoned before rapidly breeding.

I have been advised by our Environmental Health experts that because of the health risks associated with the uncontrolled and increasing numbers of feral chickens, that a cull of their numbers has to be carried out.

Regrettably I have no choice but accede this advice. The cull is in progress using humane methods in accordance with the law.

The public are asked not feed feral chickens or abandon any domestic animals in this way to prevent the problem reoccurring. Such actions are in breach of the law.

– Deputy John Young, Environment Minister

We recognise that feral chickens create problems for local communities and pose a risk to other local flocks in the event of the potential threat of notifiable diseases, e.g. bird flu.

Officers are discussing how best to practically deal with this challenge as it is likely that if left unchecked,and without predators to the extent that there are in, say the UK, numbers will very soon be much more difficult to handle and this will exacerbate issues already being experienced.

– Willie Peggie, Planning and Environment

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