A mural highlighting the effects of climate change has been unveiled in Jersey.

The Climate Stripes for Jersey is a visual representation of how the island's annual average air temperature has changed since records began at the Maison St Louis Observatory.

Each of the 126 stripes represents one year from 1894 through to 2019, and is coloured and shaded depending on how much cooler or warmer the annual average air temperature was compared to the 30-year average air temperature between 1971 and 2000.

The mural is based on an idea developed by Professor Ed Hawkins MBE - a scientist known for his data visualization graphics portraying global warming - and has been created by artist Ian Rolls, on a wall by the underpass in St Helier.

Today (3 June), it was unveiled by the Assistant Minister for the Environment, Deputy Gregory Guida.

I hope that it will help islanders to both understand the problem of climate change and think about how we can all help it to be addressed. During the https://www.itv.com/news/channel/2020-03-25/coronavirus-all-the-information-and-advice-for-the-channel-islands-in-one-place/, many islanders have found ways to reduce carbon emissions by walking and cycling more. We should celebrate that fact and march on towards our https://www.itv.com/news/channel/2019-05-03/environment-minister-to-bring-forward-plans-to-make-island-carbon-neutral/.

Deputy Gregory Guida, Assistant Minister for the Environment