Historian wins prestigious award for work on Channel Islands Nazi Occupation

The archaeologist and historian has spent much of her career researching and raising awareness of the history of the Channel Islands during the Second World War. Credit: ITV Channel TV

University of Cambridge academic Dr Gilly Carr has won the prestigious 2020 European Archaeological Heritage Prize for her work on the Nazi Occupation of the Channel Islands during World War Two.

The prize has been awarded annually since 1999 to individuals or institutions who have made outstanding contributions to the knowledge and protection of European archaeological heritage.

Dr Carr's research has transformed awareness of Channel Islander victims of Nazi persecution both in the Channel Islands and internationally. By raising the profile of these people through 'traditional' and online heritage, and their suffering in Nazi prisons and concentration camps, has not only returned a lost history to the Channel Islands, but also enriched understandings internationally.

University of Cambridge

The archaeologist and historian has spent much of her career researching and raising awareness of victims and survivors of the Nazis. Last year Dr Carr was chosen as a new representative to join the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

My work has raised awareness of all categories of victims and survivors of Nazism - deportees, forced labourers and Jews - but it is the political prisoners who have a special place in my heart and I sincerely hope my work has begun to rehabilitate their memory.

Dr Gilly Carr, Fellow and Director of Studies in Archaeology at St Catharine's College

Dr Carr has dedicated the award to the political prisoners of the Channel Islands which she says seems "particularly fitting" on the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the camps.