Islanders urged to protect pets and keep them away from chocolate this Easter

The GSPCA says that chocolate is highly poisonous to many pets, with dogs being most commonly affected. Credit: PA Images

Islanders are being urged not to put their pets at risk by feeding them chocolate over Easter.

The GSPCA says chocolate is highly poisonous to many pets, with dogs being most commonly affected.

Due to the Coronavirus restrictions and with so many of us once again at home this Easter you might be planning an Easter Egg Hunt in your house or garden but please ensure if you are your pets are safe." "Dogs as well as humans love the taste of chocolate and with their keen sense of smell they will sniff out hidden Easter eggs putting them at risk.

Steve Byrne GSPCA Manager

How to spot chocolate poisoning:

  • The effects of chocolate poisoning in dogs usually appear within 12 hours and can last up to three days.

  • Initial signs can include excessive thirst, vomiting, diarrhoea, a tender tummy and restlessness.

  • These symptoms can then progress to hyperactivity, tremors, abnormal heart rate, hyperthermia and rapid breathing. In severe cases there are fits, heart beat irregularities, coma or even death.

The GSPCA advises owners to get in touch with their vet immediately if their dog shows any of these signs.

Chocolate contains theobromine, which is similar to caffeine and highly toxic to dogs and other pets. High quality chocolate poses the biggest risk to pets and an average bar of dark chocolate (30-45g) contains enough theobromine to fatally poison a smaller dog.

GSPCA