Jersey looks at strengthening legal powers to tackle anti-social behaviour

Constable Len Norman accepted that anti-social behaviour is a difficult thing to deal with, and "difficult for the public too". Credit: ITV Channel TV

Jersey is looking at strengthening legal powers to tackle anti-social behaviour. The Minister for Home Affairs has confirmed that work is ongoing to identify the possibility of new legislation to better tackle anti-social behaviour in Jersey. He said anti-social behaviour was "not just an enforcement matter" but a wider issue and a joint solution is being sought.

It includes Children's Services, law officers, Children, Young People, Education and Skills (CYPES) Policies and the Children's Commissioner.

A youth justice review is currently being undertaken by the Children's Commissioner and is expected to present its findings in the coming weeks. This will then make it to the Assembly for debate later this year.Constable Len Norman accepted that anti-social behaviour is a difficult thing to deal with, and "difficult for the public too".

Retailers in Jersey have previously called for tougher action against anti-social behaviour.

From a criminal justice perspective there is currently a presumption against prosecuting young people in Jersey, and the police are limited in the measures available to them.

There are various options available from different jurisdictions. We are looking at those to see whether they could be useful in the Jersey context.

Constable Len Norman, Government of Jersey States Member

Last week, the annual report of the Children's Commissioner found the number of young people arrested by the police last year had doubled on the year before. Measures which are readily applied in the UK, such as Civil injunctions, Community Protection Notices and Criminal Behaviour Orders (replacing the old Anti-Social Behaviour Orders, or ASBOs) are currently not available in Jersey.