Jersey photographer captures rare image of ISS passing the sun

An amateur photographer from Jersey has managed to get a rare snap of the International Space Station passing in front of the sun.

Gordon Pollock from St Peter used his specialist telescope to capture the unique image, which took him three years to get.

Gordon Pollock has been photographing space for the last 45 years. Credit: ITV Channel TV

I couldn't believe it because you don't see it and you don't know you've caught it until you actually put it on your computer and start looking at the photographs because you clearly can't look at the sun and so you are relying on the information you got off the internet as to where it's going to be. It was a huge relief when I managed to get it. I'm really pleased at how sharp its turned out.

Gordon Pollock, Amateur Photographer

The International Space Station circles the Earth every 90 minutes and travels at about 17,500 miles per hour, making it very difficult to capture.

  • Gordon Pollock explains how he managed to capture the image.


Gordon has been capturing galaxies for the last 45 years. He's photographed everything from the Milky Way over Archirondel Tower to a Whirlpool Galaxy from his back garden.

  • Here is a selection of Gordon's astronomy photography:

The Milky Way taken over Archirondel Tower in Jersey. Credit: Gordon Pollock

This photograph of the Milky Way above Archirondel was taken with a normal DSLR and 14mm wide angle lens.

This is an image of a Whirlpool Galaxy taken 31 million light years from Jersey. Credit: Gordon Pollock

The Whirlpool Galaxy - M51 (Messier 51) - is 31 million light years from Jersey. Gordon snapped this with a specialist telescope.

This is a photograph of the Elephants Trunk Nebula. Credit: Gordon Pollock

The Elephants Trunk Nebula is 2,400 light years from Jersey. Gordon took this photograph using a specialist telescope.

This is a photograph of a Tulip Nebula. Credit: Gordon Pollock

The Tulip Nebula is 6,000 light years from Jersey. It is a nebula within the Milky Way that Gordon photographed with his specialist telescope.