Fears about lack of working air quality monitors in Jersey

Exhaust of a car where emissions effect clean air quality.
The number of vehicles registered in Jersey has more than doubled since 1980. Credit: ITV Channel TV

Only two out of 46 air quality monitors installed outside schools and next to streets in Jersey are working properly.

They were put in place for free in 2019 as part of a pilot project run by a UK company, and were supposed to tell the government how much pollution was in the air.

The idea was that the data would inform policy.

The only working monitors are at Howard Davis Park and Halkett Place. Credit: ITV Channel TV

However, Jersey's environment minister says the government should not be spending £100,000 on fixing the 44 which are no longer transmitting data correctly.

Deputy John Young instead wants to spend £200,000 on developing a new monitoring programme alongside another UK company.

He says the money for that would come from the Climate Emergency Fund.

Deputy Montfort Tadier is one of Jersey's politicians frustrated with the government's handling of the situation and "lack of joined up thinking".

David Postlethwaite, a parent of a four and seven-year-old in Jersey, has been telling ITV News that he is concerned about the impact on children's health so long as their is no system in place to check the air quality.

The number of vehicles registered in Jersey has more than doubled since 1980, from 57,409 to 125,146 in 2017.

Jersey's government has committed to making the island carbon neutral by 2030, however skeptics of greener transport say electric cars remain too expensive for most people to buy.