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Is this Britain's strangest dating website? 'Dead Meet' matches lonely hearts in the death industry

If you're looking for love but failing to find it because your date just can't get to grips with the fact you're a grave digger, then this might be your lucky day.

'Dead Meet' dating website Credit: Dead Meet

'Dead Meet' matches up lonely hearts in death industries, such as undertakers and crematorium technicians, taxidermists and medical historians.

In fact, it's for anyone who knows that working with death can be a bit of a passion killer.

Carla Valentine, creator of 'Dead Meet' Credit: Carla Valentine

'Dead Meet' is the dating and networking site specifically for death professionals which I set up this year.

It’s a chance for like-minded people to meet romantic partners, collaborators and lecturers on specific topics as everyone is searchable by occupation.

– Carla Valentine

So far the website has around 5,000 members. Speaking to Vice, Carla Valentine, who lives in London, said people in the death industry can make great partners.

I’m sure that some funeral directors would make great boyfriends because the likelihood is they are fairly strong, able-bodied, and their jobs may have imbued them with a sense of patience or respect.

Perhaps embalmers would make better boyfriends because they use cosmetics on the deceased and they’d understand why it takes many women so long to get ready.

But at the same time, people are all different and those who work in the death industry don’t all have the same personality, although many of us have a great sense of humor.

– Carla Valentine

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Carla Valentine is a museum curator who deals with dead specimens. But her job makes it difficult for her to connect with people whose jobs don't involve death.

I just wanted to be able to chat to someone who could really understand me. I wanted more friends in the same profession, not just my co-workers, and perhaps even a partner to talk to in the wee small hours of the night.

When asked, 'How was your day?' I wanted to be able to say how it really was, safe in the knowledge that uttering sentences not usually uttered by 'normal' people wouldn’t send someone packing.

– Carla Valentine