Sharp fall in London Covid infections: Track the infection rate in your area

The third national lockdown has driven down coronavirus infection levels, with prevalence down by around 80% in London and the South East.

The findings from Imperial College London’s React study show that infections across England declined markedly from January into February.

The research, which saw more than 85,000 swab tests carried out across England between February 4 and 13, showed that Covid-19 infections remained high but had dropped to just one in 200 people testing positive.


Below is the infection rate for every London borough for every 100,000 people between Feb 7 and Feb 13.

The national average for England was 121 per 100,000.


Barking and Dagenham: 162 cases per 100,000

Barnet: 106 cases per 100,000 people

Bexley: 94 cases per 100,000 people

Brent: 153 cases per 100,000 people

Bromley: 85 cases per 100,000 people

Camden: 64 cases per 100,000 people

Croydon: 106 cases per 100,000 people

Ealing: 185 cases per 100,000 people

Enfield: 93 cases per 100,000 people

Greenwich: 93 cases per 100,000 people

Hackney: 77 cases per 100,000 people 

Hammersmith and Fulham: 134 cases per 100,000 people

Haringey: 96 cases per 100,000 people

Harrow: 135 cases per 100,000 people

Havering: 110 cases per 100,000 people

Hillingdon: 161 cases per 100,000 people

Hounslow: 169 cases per 100,000 people

Islington: 68 cases per 100,000 people

Kensington and Chelsea: 92 cases per 100,000 people

Kingston upon Thames: 117 cases per 100,000 people

Lambeth: 113 cases per 100,000 people

Lewisham: 83 cases per 100,000 people

Merton: 144 cases per 100,000 people

Newham: 124 cases per 100,000 people

Redbridge: 108 cases per 100,000 people

Richmond upon Thames: 85 cases per 100,000 people

Southwark: 79 cases per 100,000 people

Sutton: 120 cases per 100,000 people

Tower Hamlets: 73 cases per 100,000 people

Waltham Forest: 108 cases per 100,000 people

Wandsworth: 98 cases per 100,000 people

Westminster: 72 cases per 100,000 people

Source: Govt Dashboard

Speaking about the figures across England, Steven Riley, professor of infectious disease dynamics at Imperial College London, said: “This is good news.

“This is a better decline than many people would have hoped for, certainly when we were thinking about this at the end of December.”

He added: “This is all very encouraging and it’s definitely good news.

“The note of caution is that clearly there’s still a lot of pressure on hospitals, both in terms of number of new admissions, and in the total number of people in hospitals.

“So the trend is great, but because prevalence is high, there essentially isn’t a lot of headroom – there isn’t a lot of leeway.

“Because if for any reason, we do return to growth then we’re immediately at levels of hospital pressure the same as in the peak of the first one.”