Water bills to rise by up to £80 after 'super sewer' approval

The Government has given the go-ahead for Thames Water to start building the Thames Tideway Tunnel, a 16 mile sewer across London.

The company says the sewer is needed because at the moment, raw sewage often ends up pouring into the Thames.

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'Super sewer' impact on water bills to be minimised

If the tunnel had been in operation last year, it would have captured 97% of the sewage that poured in to London’s river. Hardly a week goes by when untreated sewage is pouring in to London’s river and we are pleased that we can now start to tackle this archaic problem. This is a huge project but it’s a huge problem, and we can now get on with tackling it. It’s no easy task, but we’re confident that we can deliver this project and still achieve our aim of minimising the impact on our customer bills.

– Andy Mitchell, chief executive of Thames Tideway Tunnel

Water bills to rise after 'super sewer' approval

Thames Water has been given the go-ahead to start building London’s ‘super sewer’ which will tackle the sewage pollution in to the tidal River Thames.

Water bills will rise £70-80 Credit: PA

The 25km tunnel will run underground from Acton in West London, and travel roughly the line underneath the river to Abbey Mills Pumping Station in East London, where it will connect to the Lee Tunnel. Its construction means water bills will rise £70-80 by the mid 2020s.

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