A mother-of-two from New Milton in Hampshire says she struggles to cope after being diagnosed with tinnitus.

Claire Eveleigh says the condition, which has no cure, has left her feeling scared and lonely.

I struggle to cope and accept that I have these noises in my head for the rest of my life. I have two young children who need me and I struggle to function like I did before I had tinnitus. It's very scary and lonely and there's no peace. You can't escape it, it's with you everywhere you go, all day long."

Claire Eveleigh, Tinnitus sufferer

Tinnitus is the name for hearing noises that are not caused by an outside source.

The constant noise can be as loud as a jet engine or a dentist's drill, according to the British Tinnitus Association.

  • Click the video below to hear what tinnitus can sound like:

New research from the charity has found that tinnitus can put a huge strain on someone's mental health as it can affect a person's social life and career.

In a recent survey by the charity, one in seven people said that they have had suicidal thoughts.

7.1m

people in the UK have persistent tinnitus

One in five people with the hearing condition think about it every few minutes.

The British Tinnitus Association is calling for increased investment into the condition to help find a cure.

For some people, listening to sounds in the background can help as well as mindfulness and relaxation. If the tinnitus is hearing loss related, wearing a hearing aid can help but for many techniques like that don't work."

Kerry Chase, British Tinnitus Association

The Department for Health and Social says that the National Institute for Health Research has invested more than £200,000 in research into tinnitus in the last three years and welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including tinnitus.