Mother says new test to detect cancers could prevent heartbreak after her daughter died of bowel cancer

A mother from Buckinghamshire has offered to take part in the trial of a new blood test which could detect 50 different types of cancer.

A mother from Buckinghamshire has offered to take part in the trial of a new blood test which could detect 50 different types of cancer, before they become too advanced to treat.

Margaret Chung from Princes Risborough lost her daughter to bowel cancer. She says the test could prevent others from similar heartbreak.

  • Report by ITV News Meridian's Will Walters:

Margaret Chung from Buckinghamshire knows all too well the devastating impact Cancer can have.  She lost her daughter Annabel to bowel cancer in November 2016.

She'd been going to see her GP with symptoms for three years but her diagnosis was too late to save her. 

  • Margaret Chung, mother:

Now, a revolutionary new treatment could save other parents from suffering the same fate. It's a blood test that could detect over 50 different types of cancer much earlier. 

The Galleri blood test, which can detect early stage cancers through a simple blood test, will be piloted with 165,000 patients in a deal struck by NHS England.

NHS England said research on patients with signs of cancer suggests the test can identify many types that are difficult to diagnose early, such as head and neck, ovarian, pancreatic, oesophageal and some blood cancers.

Developed by US-based company Grail, the test checks for molecular changes.

If the programme shows that the test also works as expected for people without symptoms, it will be rolled out to become routinely available.

NHS to pilot blood test that may detect more than 50 cancers



  • Peter Johnson, NHS cancer lead:

Margaret Chung says she herself would be willing to take part in the trial 


The test would be good because I suppose with all the cancer research that's been done most cancers are treatable if they're found early. But it's the getting the results that early which would make a difference.

Margaret Chung

The results from the trial are due back by 2023 and if successful the test could be rolled out to millions by 2025.