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Bloodhound's Kent driver aims for 1000mph

The world's fastest car will be tested in public today (Thursday). Eventually, it's hoped The Bloodhound will speed through the South African desert at 1000mph, with a driver from Kent at the wheel.

Are you ready to switch to an electric car?

We have been looking into the future of electric cars - as Britain looks set to end the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles by the year 2040.

Figures show a big increase in plug-in car sales over the last few years - but our survey shows not everyone is ready to make the switch.

Matt Price reports from Norway to see whether lessons can be learned from overseas.

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Schoolchildren take part in biggest outdoor virtual reality classroom

The biggest virtual reality primary school lesson outside of the classroom has taken place on Brighton's beach.

Under the gaze of the i360 and next to the historic West Pier, 140 children journeyed to Rio de Janeiro and Mont Blanc.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to organiser Mark Slade and Tracey Bower from Hertford Infants School.

More than 300 BAE jobs will be lost in Portsmouth

More than 300 jobs will be lost in Portsmouth Credit: PA

BAE is facing an order gap for the Typhoon, slowing production ahead of an expected order from Qatar. Around 340 jobs will be lost in Portsmouth.

Production of the Hawk jet aircraft is ending in the next few years, affecting the Brough site in Yorkshire, although Qatar could place a new order.

Around 400 redundancies are being planned at Brough.

Most of the military air job cuts will go in 2018 and 2019, with some planned for 2020 and BAE said its goal is to achieve as many voluntary redundancies as possible.

Around 375 job losses are planned for the maritime servicing and support business, with 340 in Portsmouth.

BAE's cyber intelligence business will cut 150 jobs, split between sites in London, Guildford in Surrey, and overseas.

The total number of proposed redundancies is 1,915.

1 in 10 have fallen victim to cyber-criminals

Cybercrime is rarely out of the headlines these days - with universities the latest to be revealed as targets for cyber attack with hackers trying to steal sensitive research information. Cybercrime takes many forms - it's any criminal activity involving computers or the internet. In the first of a series of reports about the problem, Kevin Ashford has been finding out how the criminals operate - and the people they target.

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New quieter planes take to the skies

They're only half as noisy as existing aircraft - planes powered by a new generation of more environmentally friendly engines are about to take to the skies over the South of England.

It's a move that's being welcomed by campaigners, but they argue that much more still needs to be done. Our transport correspondent Mike Pearse has been given exclusive access to the new whispering giants.

Calls to fit sprinklers in all schools a year after fire

Credit: ITV Meridian

It has been a year since a fire ripped through Selsey Academy near Chichester and now there are calls for all schools to be fitted with sprinklers.

Since 2010, less than 40% of new build schools have had sprinkler systems installed.

Sussex Fire says the devices wouldn't have prevented the flames spreading at Selsey because the fire started on the roof.

As Chloe Oliver reports.

Chloe spoke to Tom Garfield, Headteacher at Selsey Academy and Maisie Rudkin from West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service.

AA says councils should scrap pay by phone parking

Credit: ITV Meridian

A new report from the AA says councils should scrap mandatory pay by phone parking as they are deeply unpopular, with two thirds of drivers refusing to use them.

The cashless parking machines accept payment by drivers calling or texting an automated service.

More and more towns in our region have adopted the technology.

As Andy Dickenson reports.

Andy spoke to Jack Cousens from the AA and Cllr Gill Mitchell Brighton and Hove City Council, Lab.

Inventor uses implanted microchip to start car

The Hampshire inventor has implanted the microchip in his hand Credit: ITV Meridian

An inventor from Hampshire has created a tiny microchip inserted into his hand, that's only the size of a grain of rice, to start his car and open his office door.

Steven Northam just waves his hand over a sensor to operate daily tasks and is now offering the service to others for the first time.

As Chloe Oliver reports.

Chloe spoke to Steven Northam, entrepreneur and inventor and Dr Geoff Watson, Anesthetic Consultant.

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