Crisis warning as number of elderly 'to overtake carers'

The number of older people needing informal care will outstrip the number of family members able to provide it as early as 2017, leading think tank IPPR has claimed.

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UK should build 'new community institutions' for elderly

Britain should build "new community institutions" specifically designed to help elderly people live independent lives to cope with the looming care crisis.

IPPR senior research fellow Clare McNeil said:

The supply of unpaid care to older people with support needs by their adult children will not keep pace with future demand.

Thousands of people in their 60s and 70s today could be left to cope on their own when they need care in the future, with overstretched services unable to make up the shortfall.

Britain needs to build new community institutions capable of sustaining us through the changes ahead and to adapt the social structures already in place, such as family and care, public services, the workplace and neighbourhoods.

– Clare McNeil

Not enough family carers for elderly 'by 2017'

There will not be enough family members to provide informal care for their elderly relatives as early as 2017, a leading think tank has warned.

IPPR published the research into social policy called the Condition of Britain. Credit: PA

IPPR warned there would be more than a million elderly people without adult children to care for them by 2030, as they published research on rising care costs.

The report shows the average annual cost for an older person who pays for a typical package of care has increased to £7,900 a year, an average £25,000 for home care and an average £36,000 for a nursing home.

IPPR pointed to Germany, Japan and Australia as examples of countries with ageing populations which had coped well in the absence of adult children.

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