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Warrington retains IBF featherweight crown after split decision win over Galahad

Josh Warrington clung on to his IBF featherweight title after a controversial split decision win over Kid Galahad in Leeds. Credit: PA

Josh Warrington clung on to his IBF featherweight title after a controversial split decision win over Kid Galahad in Leeds.

The home favourite gained the verdict by 116-112 and 116-113 on two of the judges' scorecards with Howard Foster favouring the challenger by 115-113.

Galahad had largely frustrated Warrington through much of the contest and had appeared to land the cleaner if less powerful work.

But ultimately Warrington's sheer will to win somehow saw him through, albeit in a fashion far removed from his previous epic triumphs over Lee Selby and Carl Frampton.

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Khan: I would be 'stupid' not to take Saudi Arabia fight

Khan will fight Goyat in Saudi Arabia. Credit: PA

Amir Khan has defended the choice of location for his next fight in the face of human rights concerns by claiming Saudi Arabia is undergoing significant change.

The 32-year-old faces unheralded Indian Neeraj Goyat at King Abdullah Sports City in Jeddah on July 12 less than three months after he was controversially stopped in six rounds by Terence Crawford.

Amnesty International have described the Saudi human rights record as "abysmal", adding that the nation is in the "grip of a sweeping crackdown against critics of the government", and implored Khan to travel there with his "eyes firmly open".

Khan is reportedly being paid £7million - £3million more than he earned against Crawford - to headline a team event between fighters representing Pakistan and India.

The former unified world welterweight champion is a Muslim and has embarked on pilgrimages to Saudi Arabia on a number of occasions, offering him his own perspective on the country.

"When I was there last, it had all changed. I started seeing women not wearing head scarves. Women were out driving," Khan said.

"They had a huge concert where everyone was dancing and enjoying themselves. I'd never seen that side of Saudi Arabia before.

"Maybe now they are changing to make it that new place where people can enjoy themselves and it's fair for women. I think they're trying to change now.

"They are throwing a lot of money on to the table, and at the end of the day we are prizefighters. For me, I would be stupid to not take this opportunity."

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