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Wiggins: Ratcliffe takeover of Team Sky 'ideal situation' for Brailsford

A takeover of Team Sky by Britain's richest man Jim Ratcliffe would be an Credit: PA

A takeover of Team Sky by Britain's richest man Jim Ratcliffe would be an "ideal situation" for key man Dave Brailsford, according to Bradley Wiggins.

Reports have suggested Ratcliffe, the founder and chairman of the Ineos chemicals company who has a £21billion fortune, will step in to replace Sky's sponsorship, with confirmation of a deal said to be imminent.

Ineos and Team Sky declined to comment when contacted by Press Association Sport.

Sky announced in December it would be ending its association with the team at the end of the year. The partnership has extended beyond 10 years, with the team securing eight Grand Tour victories during that period from the likes of Wiggins, Chris Froome and Geraint Thomas.

And Tour de France winner Wiggins believes a deal with Ratcliffe would benefit the team under the continuing leadership of general manager Brailsford.

"Dave will want to retain control and it is Dave's way in terms of the way he manages the team, the way he sets the team up," the Olympic gold medallist said in the first episode of the new series of The Bradley Wiggins Show by Eurosport.

"I think he would have been reluctant to have another multi-national company that came in that wanted it for the advertisement and to get their name out there, but would want the control in terms of 'This is how we want to do it in terms of how we advertise our company'.

"I think that would have been a big point for Dave. So in some ways it's an ideal situation.

"He (Ratcliffe) is the richest man in Britain and you would imagine that the kind of money they have asked for is nothing to him.

"Dave can continue running out this team with all his plans and philosophies, so it's an ideal situation for him and he is answerable you'd imagine to one man - it's his money. It will certainly help that team."

Future looks bright for Brailsford's team, says Wiggins

Credit: PA

Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins believes the loss of Team Sky's sponsorship will not be detrimental as new money coming in ensures key man Dave Brailsford's plans will be unaffected.

The media giant announced in December it would be ending its association with the team at the end of the year. The partnership has extended beyond 10 years, with the team securing eight Grand Tour victories during that period.

Reports have suggested Britain's richest man Jim Ratcliffe, with a £21billion fortune, will step in and Wiggins thinks that will benefit the team under the continuing leadership of general manager Brailsford.

"Dave will want to retain control and it is Dave's way in terms of the way he manages the team, the way he sets the team up," the Olympic gold medallist said in the first episode of the new series of The Bradley Wiggins Show by Eurosport.

"I think he would have been reluctant to have another multi-national company that came in that wanted it for the advertisement and to get their name out there, but would want the control in terms of 'This is how we want to do it in terms of how we advertise our company'.

"I think that would have been a big point for Dave. So in some ways it's an ideal situation.

"He (Ratcliffe) is the richest man in Britain and you would imagine that the kind of money they have asked for is nothing to him.

"Dave can continue running out this team with all his plans and philosophies, so it's an ideal situation for him and he is answerable you'd imagine to one man - it's his money. It will certainly help that team."

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Wiggins rules out Olympic Games comeback in rowing

Credit: PA

Five-time Olympic champion cyclist Sir Bradley Wiggins says he has shelved plans to bid to make the Great Britain rowing team at the 2020 Olympics.

The 2012 Tour de France winner retired from cycling in December 2016 and flirted with the idea of rowing competitively, taking part in last December's British Rowing Indoor Championships at the Lee Valley Velodrome.

The 38-year-old told his eponymous Eurosport show: "I'm still training most days with it, but I've decided I'm not going to the Olympics because I've got too much other stuff to do.

"I need to give myself a break. I haven't got time to train three times a day. To the level I want to do it to, it's a full-time job in itself. There's too much going on."

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