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Celtic fan with Down's syndrome wins SPL goal award

An 11 year-old Celtic fan with Down's syndrome has won the Scottish Professional League's goal of the month award for January.

Jay Beatty's touching story dates back to last summer when Georgios Samaras picked him out of the crowd as Celtic celebrated winning the SPL title.

He was invited into the club's dressing room before last month's league game against Hamilton, and scored a penalty on the pitch at half-time in front of his fellow Celtic supporters.

After being nominated alongside a string of professional players for last month's award, Beatty polled a staggering 97% of the vote to claim victory.

Watch Jay's award winning strike in the link below. Credit: SPL

Jay's father, Martin Beatty, thanked the thousands of football fans who voted for his goal.

He said: "Not many of us get to live our dreams and Jay is getting to live all our dreams. Thank you to everyone for making this possible - we are so grateful and proud."

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Down's syndrome research an 'exciting breakthrough'

A scientist from Cambridge University has praised the research into Down's syndrome describing the findings as an "exciting breakthrough".

Researchers believe they have found a way of silencing the extra chromosome which is the root cause of Down's syndrome.

Neurogeneticist Dr Lucy Raymond, from Cambridge University, said:

"This is an exciting breakthrough, but this process is still at a very early (cellular) stage and we are nowhere near seeing this procedure being used in the treatment of Down's syndrome in people."

"This new study could, however, lead to extremely useful further studies looking at which particular genes on chromosome 21 cause certain aspects of Down's syndrome, and which might therefore be good targets for therapeutic agents."

Down's syndrome genetic defect could be 'switched off'

US Scientists have developed a way to "switch off" the genetic defect responsible for Down's syndrome.

Children with Down's syndrome are born with three copies of chromosome 21 instead of two.

This extra chromosome causes a delay in the way a child develops and leads to a range of health problems.

However researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School believe they have found a way of silencing the extra chromosome which is the root cause of the disorder.

The technique has only been trialed on laboratory cell cultures, but scientists hope it could lead to a new form of "chromosomal therapy".

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