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Lights go out on Tower Bridge as Britain remembers

The lights on some of Britain's most famous landmarks have been switched off for an hour tonight to remember the 17 million who gave their lives in the First World War.

Tower Bridge, the Houses of Parliament and St Paul's Cathedral all went dark from 10 pm.

Britain officially declared war on Germany at 11pm on August 4, 1914. The conflict lasted four years.

Lights go out for an hour to remember war dead

Lights across Britain have been switched off for an hour tonight in a tribute to the 17 million killed in the First World War.

Landmarks including the Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge and St Paul's Cathedral all went dark from 10pm.

Prime Minister David Cameron had asked Britons to switch off all but a single light in their homes for an hour.

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No 10 to turn out the lights for WW1 memorial event

Number 10 is among the buildings that will turn their lights out in an hour's time to mark the moment Britain declared war on Germany and joined the First World War.

Are you joining in the Lights Out event? Post pictures of your "moment of reflection" on our Facebook page.

The Last Post played at moving WW1 ceremony

A lone bugler played The Last Post during a moving ceremony at St Symphorien military cemetery near Mons, Belgium.

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Archbishop: War represents 'abject failure of humanity'

War must always represent the abject failure of humanity, the head of the Anglican church in Ireland has said.

Archbishop of Armagh Dr Richard Clarke said commemorating the First World War could not be spiritually separated from the situation in Gaza and other recent conflicts.

The Caucasus front pictured during the First World War. Credit: AA / TT/TT News Agency/Press Association Images

Dr Clarke said: "War must always represent the abject failure of the human spirit and of humanity itself.

"It can never be other and we should never pretend it is other."

William and Cameron lay wreaths at twilight service

The Duke of Cambridge and David Cameron have laid wreaths during a twilight ceremony commemorating the First World War.

The Duke of Cambridge and Prime Minister David Cameron accept the wreaths.
The wreaths are laid at the St Symphorien military cemetery near Mons, Belgium, during a twilight ceremony.
A lone guard plays the Last Post at the ceremony.

Cameron: People should never fail to cherish peace

People should "never fail to cherish" peace, David Cameron said as he joined a twilight ceremony to mark 100 years since Britain joined the First World War.

Cameron told those assembled at St Symphorien military cemetery near Mons, Belgium: "This was a war with an immense human cost - and we must always, always remember that, no matter how busy things are.

David Cameron told people at the ceremony, 'In shaping that future, it is vital that we look to the past' Credit: REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

"In shaping that future, it is vital that we look to the past. Here on the continent of Europe we saw not the war to end all wars, but the precursor to another desperate and violent conflict just two decades later.

"We should never fail to cherish the peace between these nations and never underestimate the patient work it has taken to build that peace."

Queen honours WW1 soldiers in Crathie Kirk service

The Queen has attended a service of commemoration for WW1 soldiers in Aberdeenshire's Crathie Kirk Church.

The Queen has attended a service of commemoration to mark the start of the First World War. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
The Queen sits in Crathie Kirk Church in Crathie, Aberdeenshire. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
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