The North East's fallen heroes from Afghanistan

Sapper Adam Moralee, from Gateshead. Credit: MoD

Lance Corporal Jonathan McKinlay, 33, from Darlington served with the 1st Battalion the Rifles, based in Gloucestershire.

He was shot by insurgents while on patrol in Helmand Province in September 2011.

He is survived by his widow, Lisa, who described her husband as "her one in a million," and three children.

Private Dean Hutchinson. Credit: MoD

Private Dean Hutchinson, 23, from Spennymoor, served with the Royal Logistic Corps.

He was killed alongside Private Robert Wood when fire swept through a logistical centre at Camp Bastion in Helmand on February 14 2011.

At their inquests, the coroner criticised the Ministry of Defence for a series of failures over their deaths.

Private John King. Credit: MoD

Private John King, 19, from Darlington served with the 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment.

He was killed in an explosion in Helmand Province in December 2011 while on foot patrol.

He leaves behind parents Karen and Barry, brothers Ian and Stephen and girlfriend Kelly.

Captain Richard Holloway. Credit: MoD

Captain Richard Holloway, 29, served with the Royal Engineers.

He was killed in December 2013, two days before Christmas, after coming under enemy fire while on operations near Kabul.

He leaves behind parents Jaquie and Neil, brother Luke and girlfriend Sandy.

Corporal Lee Brownson. Credit: MoD

Corporal Lee Brownson, 30, of Bishop Auckland, served with 3rd Battalion The Rifles.

He was killed in January 2010 after being fatally injured while on foot patrol in Helmand Province.

He was posthumously honoured for his heroism with a Conspicuous Gallantry Cross.

He leaves behind his widow Leeanne, and three children.

Sergeant Barry Keen Credit: MoD

Sergeant Barry Keen, 34, from Rowlands Gill, Gateshead served with 14 Signal Regiment.

He was killed in July 2007 in a mortar attack in Helmand Province when a single mortar round landed next to him.

He had spent nearly 18 years in the Army.

Serjeant Steven Campbell. Credit: MoD

Serjeant Steven Campbell, 30, from Pelton in County Durham served with 3rd Battalion the Rifles.

He was killed in an explosion while on foot patrol in Helmand Province in March 2010.

He leaves behind his widow, Lisa and son, Brandon.

“Serjeant” is the traditional spelling used by The Rifles.

Rifleman Daniel Wild. Credit: MoD

Rifleman Daniel Wild, 19, from Easington, served with 2nd Battalion The Rifles.

He was killed when a bomb exploded in Helmand in August 2009, while trying to save an injured colleague.

The army mine detector operator received a posthumous mention in dispatches the year after his death for saving numerous lives and preventing serious injuries.

Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter. Credit: MoD

Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter, 29, from County Durham served with the 1st Battalion, Royal Gurkha Rifles.

He was shot dead by an Afghan who he believed to be an ally at a checkpoint in Helmand Province in October 2012. Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar was also killed.

He had initially disarmed the man, but then gave him back the AK-47, believing he was a member of the Afghan Uniformed Police.

His family said he was 'fiercely loyal' to his family, "loved the Gurkhas and died among friends doing the job that he wanted to do."

Sapper Daryn Roy. Credit: MoD

Sapper Daryn Roy, 28, from Dipton, County Durham, served with Ripon-based 21 Engineer Regiment.

He was killed in a roadside bomb while on patrol in Helmand Province in May 2010.

When he died, people in his village covered their homes and the local pub with England flags in tribute to his bravery.

Warrant Officer Class 2 (WO2) Charles Wood. Credit: MoD

Warrant Officer Class 2 (WO2) Charles Wood, 34, from Middlesbrough, served with 23 Pioneer Regiment RLC (Royal Logistic Corps).

The bomb disposal expert was killed in an IED explosion in Helmand Province in December 2010.

He leaves behind his widow, Heather, who described her husband as her 'best friend' with a 'heart of gold.'

Guardsman Simon Davison. Credit: MoD

Guardsman Simon Davison, 22, who was born in Newcastle, served with the 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards.

He was shot dead while manning a checkpoint in southern Afghanistan in May 2007.

At the time of his death, his commanding officer Lieutenant Colonel Carew Hatherley said that Guardsman Davison "always wanted to be a soldier...and was immensely proud of the uniform he wore."

Sapper Adam Moralee. Credit: MoD

Sapper Adam Moralee, 23, from Ryton, Gateshead, served with 32 Engineer Regiment Group.

He died after being fatally injured in Camp Bastion in March 2014, while preparing engineering equipment for redeployment out of Afghanistan.

After his death, his family said: "Adam was a loving son, fiancé and friend who touched everyone’s hearts that came into contact with him.

"His passion for cars and anything with an engine made him a true petrolhead through and through."

Lance Corporal Kenneth Rowe. Credit: MoD

Lance Corporal Kenneth Rowe, 24, from Newcastle was an army dog handler, served with the Royal Army Veterinary Corps.

He died along with his labrador, Sasha, in July 2008, when their routine patrol was ambushed by a rocket-propelled grenade attack in the Kandahar region.

Together, they were tasked with carrying out advance patrols to find safe routes for soldiers and sniffing out weapons and IEDs.

In April this year, Sasha was posthumously given the PDSA Dickin Medal, the highest military award for an animal in recognition of scores of civilian and soldiers' lives she saved.

Captain Andy Griffiths. Credit: MoD

Captain Andy Griffiths, from Richmond, North Yorkshire, served with 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment.

He died in September 2010 at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham after being wounded in an explosion while leading an operation in Helmand Province.

He served with the same regiment as his father. After he died his family said: "We are immensely proud of him and all that he has achieved in his all too short a life."

Corporal Damian Lawrence. Credit: MoD

Corporal Damian Lawrence, from Scarborough, served with the 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards)

He died in February 2008 in Helmand Province, after being fatally wounded in an explosion while trying to clear a compound.

He leaves behind a daughter, Jessica, who was three when her father died.

Marine David Charles Hart. Credit: MoD

Marine David Charles Hart, 23, from Upper Poppleton in North Yorkshire served with the 40 Commando Royal Marines.

He was killed in an explosion while on foot patrol in the Sangin District of Helmand Province in July 2010.

After his death, his parents Dilys and Chris said: "His cheerfulness, his sense of humour and of course his smile will be sorely missed, but never forgotten. We are immensely proud, as he was, of his achievements.."

Corporal Bryan Budd. Credit: MoD

Corporal Bryan Budd, 29, from Ripon, North Yorkshire, served with 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment.

He died after being fatally injured during a fire fight with Taliban forces in Sangin, Helmand Province in August 2006.

An inquest ruled he was 'probably' killed by friendly fire.

He was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for acts of "inspirational leadership and the greatest valour."

He leaves behind his widow Lorena and two daughters.

Lance Bombardier Matthew Hatton. Credit: MoD

Lance Bombardier Matthew Hatton, 23, from Easingwold in North Yorkshire, served with the 40th Regiment Royal Artillery.

He was killed during a foot patrol in the Sangin area of Helmand Province in August 2009.

He was injured in the first blast, which killed Rifleman Daniel Wild, and then fatally wounded in a second blast, while trying to clear an extraction route for a helicopter landing site.

After his death, his family said: "He was very brave and a credit to both us and the Army.

"We are really proud of him as our son, as a brother and as a soldier."

Guardsman Michael Sweeney. Credit: MoD

Guardsman Michael Sweeney, 19, from Blyth, Northumberland, served with 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards.

He was killed in April 2010 as a result of an explosion that happened in the Babaji district of central Helmand province.

He leaves behind his parents Michael and Kim, brother Sean, and fiancee Michelle.

After his death, his family said: "Michael was a proud Guardsman and we are immensely proud of what Michael has achieved in such a short lifetime."

Corporal Andrew Roberts. Credit: MoD

Corporal Andrew Roberts, 32, from Hemlington on Teesside, served with 23 Pioneer Regiment, The Royal Logistics Corps.

He was killed in an indirect fire attack alongside Private Ratu Silibaravi in the northern part of Nahr-e Saraj district in May 2012.

Corporal Roberts leaves behind his daughters Jessica, and Kayla, and son Kyle. After his death, they said in a statement: "You were the best Dad, we remember all the fun things we did, we will never forget you and will love you forever.

"You are our Hero and we will pray for you always."

Lance Corporal Sean Tansey. Credit: MoD

Lance Corporal Sean Tansey, 26, from Washington served with The Life Guards.

He died in August 2006 when he was crushed while repairing a tank at a military base in northern Afghanistan.

Rifleman Mark Turner. Credit: MoD

Rifleman Mark Turner, 21, from Gateshead, served with the 3rd Battalion The Rifles (3 RIFLES).

He was killed in April 2010 in an explosion while on foot patrol in Helmand Province.

Rifleman Turner was known as "Turtle" to his friends and was a 'fanatical Newcastle United supporter, according to his family."

After his death, Major Mike Lynch, Officer Commanding C Company, 3 RIFLES said: "I am in no doubt that he saved the lives of many of his fellow Riflemen - his mental and physical endurance were truly remarkable."

Acting Sergeant John Amer. Credit: MoD

Acting Sergeant John Amer, from Sunderland served with 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards.

He was killed in November 2009 as the result of an explosion in central Helmand province.

After his death, his widow Sue said: "I have lost my true love, my heart has been broken.

"The whole world should know that John was the best father that our daughter could have wished for."

James Thompson. Credit: MoD

James Thompson, 27, from Whitley Bay, was a special forces soldier.

He died instantly after treading on an IED in Helmand Province in May 2008.

After his death, his family said: "James was proud to be a soldier - he died doing the job that he loved and will be sadly missed by all."

Marine Tony Evans. Credit: MoD

Marine Tony Evans, 20, from Sunderland, served with J Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines.

He died in November 2008 alongside Marine Georgie Sparks after being badly wounded during an attack by insurgents armed with rocket-propelled grenades in Helmand Province.

After his death, his family said: "The Royal Marines was his life since the age of 13 when he became a Royal Marines cadet.

"We, his family, are very proud of what he achieved and will miss him dearly."

Lance Corporal Kyle Marshall. Credit: MoD

Lance Corporal Kyle Marshall, from Newcastle, served with 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

He was fatally wounded by an IED in Helmand Province in February 2011.

He leaves behind his father Garry, his mother Olywn and his fiancée, Hayley, whom he was due to marry after the tour.

Private Damien Jackson. Credit: MoD

Private Damien Jackson, from South Shields, served with the 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment.

He died in July 2006 during a firefight with Taliban forces in Helmand Province.

He was a keen football fan and Sunderland AFC fanatic who made every effort to return home to see matches.

After his death, his father said: "A fine, upstanding South Shields lad, Damien was immensely proud to have achieved his ultimate ambition in becoming a member of the finest regiment in the British Army."

Corporal Steven Dunn. Credit: MoD

Corporal Steven Dunn from Gateshead served with 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment (2 PARA) Battle Group.

He was killed in December 2010 in Helmand Province when the vehicle he was travelling in hit an improvised explosive device.

He leaves behind his wife Cheryl and daughter Emily.

Private Nathan Cuthbertson. Credit: MoD

Private Nathan Cuthbertson, 19, from Sunderland served with the 2nd Battalion the Parachute Regiment.

He was killed alongside two colleagues when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive while they were on foot patrol in Helmand Province in June 2008.

His younger brother, Connan, joined the same regiment after Nathan's death.

Lance Corporal Christopher Roney. Credit: MoD

Lance Corporal Christopher Roney, 23, from Sunderland served with 3rd Battalion The Rifles.

He died from head injuries sustained during 'friendly fire' when he was shot by a US helicopter crew who thought they were attacking an army base in December 2009.

A coroner recorded a verdict of "mistaken beliefs and cumulative failures" on his death.

Marine John Manuel. Credit: MoD

Marine John Manuel, 38, from Gateshead, served with X squadron, 45 Commando.

He was killed along with two other soldiers by a 13-year-old suicide bomber in December 2008.

He was nearing the end of his career with the Royal Marines when he died.

Sapper David Watson. Credit: MoD

Sapper David Watson, 23, from Whickham, served with 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal).

The bomb disposal expert died in December 2009 of wounds sustained in an explosion caused by an Improvised Explosive Device in the Sangin region of Helmand Province.

After his death, his family said: “He lived his dream and did what a true soldier is ready to do for his country, a true hero."

Craftsman Andrew Found. Credit: MoD

Craftsman Andrew Found, from Whitby, North Yorkshire, served with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

He was killed in June 2011 by an explosion while on an operation within the northern Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province.

After his death, his wife Samantha said: "You loved your job, your family and friends and always loved a good joke.

"You always made me smile. I will love you always and forever. You were my rock and my hero and always will be. I love you so much."

Trooper Ashley David Smith. Credit: MoD

Trooper Ashley David Smith, 21, from York, served with The Royal Dragoon Guards.

He was killed in June 2010 by an explosion while on patrol in Nahr-e Saraj in Helmand Province.

After his death, his parents Sandra and Dave and family said: "Trooper Ashley Smith was the youngest of a very close family and doted on his parents.

"He worked hard and was passionate about what he was doing and proud of all he had achieved."