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Advice on First Aid for babies and young children

Here is some advice from Millie's Trust on some common First Aid procedures for babies and young children:

ASTHMA ATTACK

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Step 1

  • Help the baby or child to sit in a comfortable position and take their medication.
  • When a baby or child has an asthma attack, the muscles in the airways narrow, making it difficult for them to breathe. Using an inhaler relaxes the muscles, allowing the air passages to expand and ease their breathing.

Step 2

  • Reassure the baby or child. If the attack becomes severe, or they don't have their medication, call 999.
  • A mild attack should ease within a few minutes. If it doesn’t, or their inhaler has no effect, call 999. Do not leave the baby or child, in case the attack becomes severe quickly.

BURNS

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Step 1

  • Cool the burn under cold running water for at least ten minutes.
  • Cooling the burn will reduce pain, swelling and the risk of scarring. The faster and longer a burn is cooled, the less the impact of the injury.

Step 2

  • Cover the burn with cling film, or a clean plastic bag if a foot or hand has a burn.
  • This helps prevent infection by keeping the area clean. Cling film or plastic bags provide an ideal covering because they don't stick to the burn and reduce pain by keeping air from the skin’s surface.

Step 3

  • Call 999 if necessary.
  • The burn may need urgent medical treatment. Always seek medical advice for a baby or child that has been burned.

CHOKING

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Step 1

  • Give up to five back blows. Hold the baby face down along your forearm with their head lower than their bottom. Hit them firmly on their back between the shoulder blades. If back blows do not dislodge the object, move on to step two.
  • The back blows create a strong vibration and pressure in the airway, which is often enough to dislodge the blockage. Dislodging the object will allow them to breathe again. Ensure you support their head while you hold them in the position described above.

Step 2

  • Give up to five chest thrusts. Turn the baby over so they are facing upwards and place two fingers in the middle of their chest just below the nipples. Push inwards and upwards up to five times. If chest thrusts do not dislodge the object, repeat steps one and two.
  • Chest thrusts squeeze the air out of the baby’s lungs and may dislodge the blockage.

Step 3

  • Call 999 if the object has not dislodged after three cycles of back blows and chest thrusts.

BROKEN BONE

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Step 1

  • Support the injury with cushions or items of clothing to prevent unnecessary movement.
  • Supporting the injury may give pain relief and prevent loss of future movement. If possible, support the limb above and below the injury.

Step 2

  • Call 999.

Step 3

  • Continue supporting the injury until help arrives.

Allergic Reaction

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Step 1

  • The baby or child may develop a red, blotchy rash, itchiness or swelling on their hands, feet or face. Their breathing may slow down. Learn more.
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea can also occur.

Step 2

  • When you observe any of these symptoms, call 999.
  • The baby or child needs urgent medical assistance. An allergic reaction can affect someone very quickly, and is potentially very serious as it may result in swelling of their airway, which causes them to stop breathing.

Step 3

  • When there is a known allergy, use their auto-injector, following the recommended guidance.
  • Once an allergy has been identified, the doctor may provide the baby or child with an auto-injector (or epi-pen). Tell the ambulance personnel if the auto-injector has been used.

Step 4

  • Reassure the baby or child, and make them as comfortable as possible while you wait for the ambulance.

For more information visit http://www.milliestrust.com

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