North East tops table for alcohol-related deaths

The North East has a rate which is 22% higher than the national average for alcohol related deaths. Credit: ITV Tyne Tees

Two sets of official figures released indicate the North East suffers from the highest rate of alcohol-related deaths in the country.

According to figures published by both Public Health England and the Office of National Statistics (ONS), the rates of alcohol-related deaths in the North East are higher for both men and women than any other region in England.

The Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE), released by Public Health England, show there were a total of 1,424 alcohol-related deaths in the North East in 2015.

1,424

alcohol-related deaths in the North East in 2015.

22%

The figure is 22% higher than the national average.

This means that the North East has a rate which is 22% higher than the national average for alcohol related deaths.

Other indicators show a similar pattern, with the death rate from chronic liver disease 40% higher than the England average.

The England-wide LAPE figures show alcohol contributed to 23,500 deaths across the country as a whole, an increase on 2014 figures.

While the ONS alcohol related death figures for England are lower, they do not take account of conditions such as heart disease, strokes and a number of alcohol related cancers.

Balance, the North East Alcohol Office, is calling on the Government to implement measures which will help tackle some of the most serious alcohol-related harms, in its next Budget on March 8.

Colin Shevills, Director of Balance, commented on the figures:

It’s clearly worrying that the North East is showing significantly higher rates of alcohol-related mortality than the rest of England.

Colin Shevills