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  1. ITV Report

Neo-Nazi teenager convicted of preparing to commit terrorist acts

Pictured: extracts from the 16-year-old's manifesto Credit: Counter Terrorism Unit

By Kris Jepson

A teenage Neo-Nazi from Durham has been convicted of six terror offences, including preparing to commit acts of terrorism in his home city between October 2017 and March this year.

The 16-year-old boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, listed venues in Durham "worth attacking" in a hand-written manifesto entitled "Storm 88 - A Manual For Practical And Sensible Guerrilla Warfare Against The Kike System In The Durham City Area, Sieg Heil."

One expert on the radical right told ITV News Tyne Tees this was the "most extreme" case he had seen in almost 20 years of research.

Watch @krisjepson's report here:

During the trial, the jury was told how the boy, who described himself as a "natural sadist" had researched Neo-Nazism, taking inspiration from far right terrorists like Anders Breivik.

The boy was described as a follower of "occult" neo-Nazism, who researched Adolf Hitler, other far-right figures and had read Mein Kampf.

The boy drew several swastika symbols in his diary Credit: Counter Terrorism Unit

The head of the Centre for Analysis of the Radical Right, Professor Matthew Feldman told ITV News Tyne Tees, there was a "shocking" level of extremism involved in the case.

Having worked in this field for nearly 20 years I've never seen something so extreme.

It really is beyond the bounds of even Neo Nazi violence into the kinds of realms of pure sadism...

I think there's new texts and new ideas on the street, most important is this idea of accelerationism which is a kind of violent, revolutionary doctrine. Anything you can do to speed up a revolution, an apocalypse, even a race war is something that is down to the individual and encouraged by these more extreme groups. At the same time these extreme groups are communicating more openly, not just on the smaller platforms... but they’re really trying to get through on the bigger platforms...

– Professor Matthew Feldman
Terror note Credit: Counter Terrorism Policing North East

The jury heard how the boy listed targets for potential attacks, including a passport office, schools, pubs, council buildings, bus stops and post offices in a section labeled "Areas To Attack" to "maximise the impact of the attacks and damage the system the most".

In one note he wrote that he wanted to target the City of Durham with "guerrilla warfare" and in another he wrote about replacing democracy with "political violence".

In one entry he wrote of planning to conduct an arson spree with Molotov cocktails on local synagogues.

Various handwritten documents were seized from his bedroom in March by police, who also found a collection of far-right literature, Manchester Crown Court heard.

Terror note Credit: Counter Terrorism Policing North East

The jury heard how the defendant had researched explosives and tried to obtain the dangerous chemical ammonium nitrate.

He also visited websites on firearms and was in communication with a gun auctioneer.

Counter-Terrorism Policing North East welcomed the convictions.

The extreme right wing views and hateful rhetoric displayed by this teenager are deeply concerning and we cannot account for those who may have been susceptible to his influence or how they may act in the future.

His extensive repetitious internet searches, diary entries and escalating behaviour combined with his desire for notoriety highlight how dangerous he could have become had he not come to the attention of the authorities.

– Det Ch Supt Martin Snowden Counter Terrorism Policing North East
Amjid Khazir Credit: ITV News

Amjid Khazir runs Middlesbrough based Media Cultured. It delivers anti-radicalisation workshops to young people across the country.

He told ITV News he was disturbed by the case, but not surprised.

Well working with young people locally it's become very apparent to us that there's a rise in anti-semitism, anti-muslim attitudes and anti-immigration comments. If they do hold anti-immigrant or racist views, it's about non-criminalisation, it's about providing an alternative narrative so that they can challenge these views and often at times you'll find there is a huge level of ignorance and naivety, people say things which they don't necessarily understand or mean. Its about challenging that view, supporting their needs and tackling that narrative of hate.

– Amid Khazir, Media Cultured

The boy will be sentenced on 7 January next year.