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North East secondary schools 'worst performing' in the country, OFSTED finds

Stock image of high school class Credit: PA

Secondary schools in the North East have been rated as the 'worst-performing' in the country.

OFSTED's annual report shows fewer schools in our region are rated as good or outstanding.

98%
of nurseries and pre-schools rated as good or outstanding in the North East (above national avg.)
90%
of primary schools in the North East are good or outstanding.
58%
of secondary schools in the North East are rated as good or outstanding.

Here's more of a regional breakdown:

For primary schools, 90% in the North East were judged to be good or outstanding, the same as in 2018.

  • In North Tyneside, 95% of inspected primary schools were judged good or outstanding compared with 83% in Darlington.
  • Hartlepool had the highest rate of improvement across the region
  • In Durham, the proportion of good or outstanding schools declined by 4 percentage points, compared with 2018.

For secondary schools, 58% in the North East were judged to be good or outstanding, the same as in 2018.

  • In Stockton-on-Tees, 77% of inspected secondary schools were judged good or outstanding compared with 30% in Redcar and Cleveland.
  • Gateshead had the highest rate of improvement across the region.
  • In South Tyneside and Sunderland, the proportion of good or outstanding schools declined by 11 percentage points compared with 2018.
OFSTED's annual report shows fewer schools in our region are rated as good or outstanding. Credit: PA

It is an absolute priority of this government to make sure children across this country receive a great education, no matter where they live.

That is why we have given up to £24 million funding to the Opportunity North East school programme, which includes providing long term support to 28 secondary schools in the area, benefiting over 20,000 young people.

– Department for Education

The regional network of head teachers, Schools North East, says it is helping tackle underlying issues.

If you've got areas of high deprivation, inevitably you have children who are less motivated, less motivated because they don't see any prospects for themselves, so we have to turn that around.

Education isn't the panacea for eveything - would that it could be - you know, social problems that exist have also got to be tackled.

We can only tackle those if we work together to change the life chances of our children both in school and in society at large.

– Maura Regan, Schools North East

A study by the Social Mobility Commission released on the same day as OFTSED's report, found that less than a third of people living in the North East thought there were good opportunities for them to do well in their region.

It contrasts dramatically with the South East, where more than double the amount of people – 74% – felt there were good avenues to success in their location.