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Reward offered for information on snakes dumped in Sunderland rubbish bin

Thirteen royal pythons were discovered inside two pillowcases on February 13. Credit: RSPCA

An animal charity is offering a £2,500 reward to find those responsible for dumping 29 snakes in pillowcases at a Sunderland fire station.

The reptiles were found abandoned outside Farringdon Fire Station last week in separate bundles.

Thirteen royal pythons were discovered inside two pillowcases on February 13 and 15 corn snakes were discovered in one pillowcase, with a male carpet python just two days later.

The snakes were found abandoned inside this rubbish bin. Credit: RSPCA

All the snakes were found in the same location and last week, sadly one of the reptiles that was found died.

The charity PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) are offering the cash reward:

We're calling on anyone who has information about these cases to come forward so that whoever abandoned these animals can be held accountable and prevented from endangering anyone else, it takes a disturbing and dangerous lack of empathy to dump so many animals."

– The organisation's director, Elisa Allen
Fifteen corn snakes were discovered in one pillowcase. Credit: RSPCA

PETA is currently campaigning for better protection for snakes in the UK urging the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs to amend current regulations immediately to ensure that snakes in pet shops and breeding facilities at least enough space to stretch out fully, thus reducing their stress and suffering.

The RSPCA believes the cases are connected and urged anyone with information to get in touch.

Inspector Heidi Cleaver rescued the second nest of snakes and has also urged people in the area to stay vigilant in case there are more vulnerable snakes dumped in the same spot:

Snakes aren't able to produce their own body heat so they rely on their environment to maintain their body temperature.

"If snakes become too cold they may be unable to feed or move normally, and their immune system will not work properly to fight disease, meaning the animal can become very ill.

"Reptiles often end up in RSPCA care after people realise they're not easy to care for, or once the novelty wears off.

"Unfortunately, many people are unaware of how much of a commitment these animals are when they take them on, as their needs are just the same as they would be in the wild and are fundamentally linked to certain behaviours, diets or environmental conditions that can be difficult to replicate in a home."

– Inspector Heidi Cleaver
Despite being dumped, the RSPCA says they were in fairly good condition. Credit: RSPCA

Despite being dumped, the RSPCA says they were in fairly good condition. They were taken to a vet to be checked over before going to a specialist reptile centre for further care.

ITV News Tyne Tees reporter Emily Reader spoke to the RSPCA after the second bundle of snakes was discovered.