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NHS death rates 'more than US'

Patients in NHS hospitals in England are 45 per cent more likely to die in hospital than patients in the USA, according to new research.

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Patients '45% more likely to die in NHS hospital than US'

Patients in NHS hospitals in England are 45 per cent more likely to die in hospital than patients in the USA, according to new research.

For more than a decade, Professor Sir Brian Jarman - the pioneer behind the hospital standardised mortality rate (HSMR) measure which helped identify under-performance in hospital trusts like Mid-Staffordshire - tracked hospital death rates in seven countries.

New research suggests patients in NHS hospitals in England are 45 per cent more likely to die in hospital than patients in the USA

Mr Jarman found that in 2004, England was worst out of the seven with 22.5 per cent higher death rates than the average and 58 per cent higher than the US.

Despite an improvement in the figures, patients in the UK are still 45 per cent more likely to die in an English NHS hospital than in America.

Professor Jarman described the figures as "shocking" during an interview with Channel 4 News, adding: "When I saw this data, it was probably the stimulus for me to speak more openly about my concerns about the NHS.

"It's not to say that we don't have some very good hospitals, but I think we also have some very poor hospitals."

Read: Healing the NHS: Patient care 'should be top priority'

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