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  1. ITV Report

Coronavirus: Seven more deaths in Northern Ireland

The number of people who have died in Northern Ireland after contracting coronavirus has risen by seven to 63. Credit: UTV

The number of people who have died in Northern Ireland after contracting coronavirus has risen by seven to 63, the Public Health Agency has said.

Health officials said testing has resulted in 91 new positive cases, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 1,089.

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A total of 4,934 patients have died in hospital after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK as of 5pm on Saturday, the Department of Health said, up by 621 from 4,313 the day before.

The number of deaths is down on the previous day's figure of 708 in a 24-hour period.

The Department of Health also said that, as of 9am on Sunday, a total of 195,524 people have been tested of which 47,806 tested positive.

The number of new people tested daily in the UK for coronavirus is back above 10,000, the latest figures revealed.

A total of 12,334 new people were reported as being tested in the 24 hours to 9am April 5.

Meanwhile in the Republic, another 21 patients who were diagnosed with Covid-19 have died, according to the health authorities, bringing the total number of deaths there to 158.

The most recent deaths were that of nine female and 12 males.

Twelve of the patients were reported to have had underlying health conditions.

Dr Catherine Calderwood has apologised for visiting her family's second home in Fife during the coronavirus pandemic. Credit: Twitter/Catherine Calderwood

Meanwhile, Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said the country's chief medical officer was wrong to visit her family's second home in Fife during the coronavirus pandemic.

Dr Catherine Calderwood, who was born in Belfast, had advised that all Scots should stay at home.

She has apologised after photos of herself and her family near a coastal retreat in Earlsferry were published in The Scottish Sun on Saturday.

The First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: "The chief medical officer made a mistake in travelling away from her home. Whatever her reasons for doing so, it was wrong and she knows that.

Ms Sturgeon said she did not know about Dr Calderwood's visits to her second home until Sunday night.

"All of us, including me, will make mistakes in these unprecedented times we are living in. When we do we must be candid about it and learn from it."

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Despite facing calls from some politicians to stand down, she said she had spoken with Ms Sturgeon about the issue and will "continue to focus entirely" on her job of advising ministers over the outbreak.

Dr Calderwood said in a statement: "I wish to apologise unreservedly for the issue reported in the media today.

"While there are reasons for what I did, they do not justify it and they were not legitimate reasons to be out of my home.

"While I and my family followed the guidance on social distancing at all times, I understand that I did not follow the advice I am giving to others, and I am truly sorry for that.

"I know how important this advice is and I do not want my mistake to distract from that.

"I have a job to do as chief medical officer to provide advice to ministers on the path of this virus and to support the medical profession as they work night and day to save lives, and having spoken with the First Minister this morning I will continue to focus entirely on that job."

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Police Scotland Chief Constable Iain Livingstone said officers had visited Dr Calderwood and issued a warning about her conduct.