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Salon offering free waxes to women if they book a smear test to raise awareness

Credit: Pink Pamper

A salon in Merthyr Tydfil is encouraging women to have smear tests by offering a free bikini wax if they book a test.

The number of women going for their smear tests in Wales is at its lowest for more than a decade.

Now the Pink Pamper in Cefn Coed is hoping to tackle the stigma. For the next three weeks, the salon is offering women a free bikini wax if they can prove they have had a smear test.

The owner, Helen Gould, said she hoped it inspires women to have a conversation about the issue as well as getting the test:

It all started two months ago when my employee, Amy evans, came to me with the idea. I thought it would be an amazing as heard personal stories about women wishing they had got a smear test earlier. So we thought why not run a campaign because we genuinely care about our clients.

We thought why not have people come in and have their bikini done. Lot of people feel uncomfortable about it but people need to talk about. The smear test is just five minutes, that's is all it is and it could save your life.

Its easy to put yourself on the back burner when you're working or your a mum. We just hope it starts a conversation. We could just save a couple of lives.

– Helen Gould, Owner
The salon in Cefn Coed is offering the free wax treatment for the next three weeks. Credit: Pink Pamper

The salon says they have already had 8 people interested in the initiative and enquire about it today.

Likewise it has been received positively online, with women praising it.

Jane Mackenzie said ''What a great way to raise awareness," while Lynnette Oakley reiterated the importance of getting the test, she said, ''It's better to be safe than sorry, get a smear.''

80%
of women feel embarrassed at the thought of a test.

What is a cervical smear test?

It is a method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix. Detecting and removing abnormal cervical cells can prevent cervical cancer.

Most women's test results show that everything is normal, but for around 1 in 20 women the test shows some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix.

According to the NHS, most of these changes won't lead to cervical cancer and the cells may go back to normal on their own.

But in some cases, the abnormal cells need to be removed so they can't become cancerous.