Caving accidents in Wales are rare but when they happen, the outcome for those involved depends on the speed and efficiency of the rescue operation above ground.

Now, an improved internet service will help improve the speed with which volunteers can reach those most in need.

The technology will allow volunteers from South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue to be contacted simultaneously when their skills are needed.

The South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue team recently gained international recognition for supporting the successful rescue of the Moo Pa young football team and their coach from a cave in Thailand.

The team carry out a practice rescue at Ogof Ffynnon Ddu Credit: ITV Wales

South Wales is an attractive location for cavers with a passion for exploring as it has some of the deepest and longest caves in the UK.

Dan Thorne, Chair of the South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue team

Prior to ultrafast broadband being made available to the depot, the charity had to rely on more traditional telephone and paper-based systems to manage their callouts and rescue attempts.

The new connection has been made possible by building on top of the infrastructure that was developed by the Superfast Cymru programme which was jointly funded by Openreach, Welsh Government and UK Government.

Now, up to 200 volunteers can be scrambled in seconds.

The South and Mid Wales Cave Rescue team recently gained international recognition for supporting the successful rescue of the Moo Pa young football team and their coach from a cave in Thailand.