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Drink driver who rammed police officer in a car in Wrexham jailed

A police officer rammed by a drink driver's car later told it was like "facing a bullet" being fired at him.

Mold Crown Court heard today how the officer was left in excruciating pain after he was struck late at night in Wrexham town centre by Jordan Anthony Gleave's car, which continued to drive the wrong way down a one way street and through a red light.

Today 24-year-old Gleave, who claimed not to remember much of the incident and who was more than twice the drink drive limit, was jailed for 12 months.

He admitted dangerous driving, assault, resisting police and driving with 88 microgrammes of alcohol, when the limit is 35.

Gleave, of Larch Avenue in Shotton, was banned from driving for two years and ordered to take an extended re-test.

PC Colin Hughes was hit to the groin, was left in pain for two weeks afterwards and had blood in his urine.

This week of all weeks the public do not need to be reminded of the dreadful, dreadful consequences that can follow from police officers bravely encountering those in motor vehicles, and those driving defy police requests.

– Judge Niclas Parry

The judge said that Gleave could have caused "truly serious injury if not worse".

He said police officers should be entitled to feel that when they went to work that they returned home safely and un-injured.

"That is not happening in North Wales.

"The court will do what it can to protect them," he said.

Judge Parry said that Gleave was in a vehicle with a female passenger when he was warned by a doorman that he was driving the wrong way down Town Hill. He reversed and struck a lamp post.

Two hours later when the defendant had consumed twice the legal limit of alcohol and unable to form any judgement he was again driving the wrong way down the same road.

He had clearly ignored the warning and had no regard to the danger he posed in Wrexham town centre, which was very busy at that time of night.

Gleave had been told the police were coming. "You continued to drive, struck a lamp post again, police saw that you were dreadfully drunk," the judge said.

He revved the engine, and while an officer tried to grab the keys he moved forward.

"A second officer bravely stood away, gave you room to enable you to see him, and raised his hand to stop you.

"But you drove straight at him because you intended to escape. You collided with him and caused immediate pain."

The officer was left in excruciating pain and described the car coming towards him like a bullet being fired at him.

Judge Parry said that it was a serious, prolonged incident when Gleave was under the influence of alcohol but his basis of plea that it was a reckless rather then deliberate offence had been accepted by the prosecution. He had no previous convictions and it was clearly out of character.

Defending barrister Philip Clemo said that his client had little recollection but was dreadfully remorseful.

He was not motivated by a hatred of police officers or anything like that but general foolishness in drink and not thinking "even seconds ahead."