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  1. ITV Report

Have voters in Wrexham changed their minds since the 2017 general election?

In 2017, ITV Wales' Jonathan Hill visited Wrexham when it was predicted the long-held Labour seat might change hands in the general election.

Three weeks before the polling stations open once again, the Wales at Six presenter has returned to the north Wales town to see how voters feel two years later.

The first poll of the election campaign revealed that Labour were ahead in Wales with a four percentage point increase since October, but showed a Conservative gain of the Wrexham seat.

Jonathan spoke to voters in this local bakery during the 2017 general election campaign.
  • How did Wrexham vote in the 2017 general election?

In 2017, Wrexham's Labour candidate Ian Lucas won the majority seat by 1,832 votes.

The Conservative candidate, Andrew Atkinson, received 43.7% of the vote.

Plaid Cymru, with 5% of the vote, and the Liberal Democrats, who gained 2.5%, both saw a fall in votes since the 2015 general election.

Ian Lucas has been the MP for Wrexham since 2001, but announced in October that he will not be standing in the next general election.

Wrexham is the largest town in north Wales.
  • Did Wrexham vote to leave or remain in the EU referendum?

59% of people in the Wrexham Council area, which includes other villages and towns, voted to leave the European Union, seeing a 71.5% turnout.

The overall decision in Wales was to leave the EU by 52.5%.

  • So how do voters feel now?
This voter said trust in politicians has fallen.

One voter - who voted to leave in the EU referendum - feels the general election is "unnecessary."

"We voted to come out of the EU, and I think that vote should stand.

"These politicians have made that many promises, and now - as somebody said on the television the other night - they can't be trusted."

This voter said she will be

Another voter said she would like to see a Brexit Party candidate win the Wrexham seat.

"I'm sick of Brexit and I'll be glad when it's all done and dusted and we leave the European Union.

"Three years on, I think it's time for us to get out, I think it's time for us to rule our own country and sort it out."

This voter voted for the Conservatives in the last general election.

One Conservative voter said he does not believe the seat will remain Labour for much longer.

"I want Corbyn out and Boris to stay in."

This voter plans to vote Labour in her first time voting in a general election.

Meanwhile, a first-time voter plans to vote Labour and said she would like to remain in the EU.

"I just like their qualities more than the other ones."

Ningbo Palletised Distribution delivers to countries across Europe.

Two years ago Jonathan visited a logistics business that deals with so-called 'just-in-time' haulage from all over the country.

While they may have taken on fifty more workers since then, managing director Chris Stockton said the last two years have been full of ups and downs.

Mr Stockton - who voted to remain - wanted a government that was good for business. Now he just wants an end to Brexit uncertainty.

I really would just like a deal - be it whatever. We'll deal with whatever is dished out to us, but another year, two years, or even months of more peaks and troughs just doesn't fill me with glee at all.

I'm minded to vote for the Conservatives based around Brexit. For somebody that was a Remainer, I would now rather we get out with some sort of a deal, even if it's an unfavourable deal. For me, a deal is a deal and let's move on.

– Chris Stockton, Ningbo managing director

Ningbo financial account Pauline Marchant was once "true blue to the core," but now said she doesn't care which party is in government.

"I don't know who's the best, and to be honest I don't really care.

"As long as somebody who's capable - and I don't really care which way they lean politically - picks the country up and sorts us out, because we're in such a terrible mess."

Professor Roger Awan-Scully of Cardiff University mapped out some of the key 'target' seats in Wales - the ones that are the most vulnerable, and the ones parties are targeting for gains.

For Labour, Professor Awan-Scully estimates the greatest concentration of vulnerability in Wales is the arc of seats in north-east Wales, including Wrexham.

Jonathan believes Wrexham acts as a

Being back in Wrexham I had a real sense of deja-vous, but equally there was a different atmosphere from two years ago.

I sensed real frustration from voters that they had been forced to the polls so soon after the last election. With the long standing MP standing down, you get the feeling that people here have been relieved of that sense of loyalty and might have an appetite for change.

It's such a strange election because normal behaviours don't seem to apply, and with the older people I spoke to it all seemed to come down to who they believed, party politics aside, would deliver on what they wanted to happen with Brexit.

But minds are not made up either, and while people might be flirting with switching their vote, it could all come down to how they feel when they are in the polling station.

Wrexham, I think, gives us a very good idea about where we are in this campaign, and where we might be when the results come in - it's a great barometer.

– Jonathan Hill, Wales at Six Presenter

Here are the candidates standing in Wrexham in the 2019 general election in the order they appear on the formal notice:

  • Sarah Elizabeth Atherton, Conservative
  • Ian Jonathan Berkeley-Hurst, Brexit Party
  • Carrie Harper, Plaid Cymru
  • Duncan Rees, Green Party
  • Tim Sly, Liberal Democrat
  • Mary Wimbury, Labour