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Your pictures as April supermoon lights up Welsh skies

A supermoon is a new or full moon that coincides with perigee, the moon’s closest point to Earth during its monthly orbit. Credit: Keith O'Brien

On Tuesday night, a supermoon lit up the night skies across the globe.

The moon was 40,000km closer to the Earth than usual, making it look bigger, brighter and even 'pink'.

The supermoon will be visible again on Wednesday night.

You have been sharing with us your pictures of the eery phenomenon as it shone above Wales.

Many people took photos of the moon from their gardens. Credit: Don Cardy

What is a supermoon?

A supermoon is a new or full moon that coincides with perigee, the moon’s closest point to Earth during its monthly orbit.

Any full moon or new moon that comes within 224,865 miles or 361,885 km (or less) of Earth, as measured from the centres of the moon and Earth, can be called a supermoon, according to the original definition.

The moon looked pink in colour in some photographs. Credit: Kelvin Davies

Why is it called a 'pink' supermoon?

The pink supermoon name is a northern Native American reference to an early-blooming wildflower, which starts to pop up in the US and Canada at the beginning of spring.

In some other cultures, the pink moon is known as the sprouting grass moon, the egg moon, and the fish moon.

The moon from Pembrokeshire. Credit: Matthew Page

How much bigger is a supermoon?

A supermoon can look up to 14 per cent bigger and 30 per cent brighter in the sky as it reaches its closest point to Earth.

April’s supermoon is the third of the year and is the closest full moon supermoon of 2020.

Kyle, 12, from Bridgend, was up at 3.30am to look at the supermoon. Credit: Hannah Lewis

Being so bright, the moon could easily be mistaken for the sun in some pictures.

One Twitter user commented on the supermoon: “It’s great that we can all do something positive and #lookup in these dark times.”

The moon pictured through a window at Gwydir Castle in Conwy. Credit: Judy Corbett
The moon captured shining through branches this morning in Cardiff, just before it set. Credit: Nigel King
The supermoon will also be visible on Wednesday night. Credit: Antony Humphreys