Tracking the trackers? GPS devices found on anti-hunt cars

Tracking the trackers? GPS devices found on anti-hunt cars Credit: League Against Cruel Sports

An anti-hunting charity says it has found tracking devices on two of their vehicles - claiming their monitors are being followed.

Hunting deer and foxes with hounds has been illegal for more than a decade now - but it is perfectly legal for hunts to use hounds to flush out animals so they can be shot.

Organisations like the RSPCA and the League Against Cruel Sports continue to monitor hunts with cameras to ensure that hunts act within the law.

Now, the League Against Cruel Sports says GPS tracking devices were found underneath two of their vehicles in the South West - leading them to claim the monitors themselves are being tracked.

The first tracker was discovered when a monitor's family car was taken in for service.

The League says it has sent information to police and is urging action is taken to protect its monitors. Credit: League Against Cruel Sports

The second was found after monitors decided to look at all their vehicles.

The League says the devices are top of the range trackers that cost about £300 each and which would continue to work for up to six months. The user would also pay to receive the tracking information.

The League says it has sent information to police and is urging action is taken to protect its monitors.

Tom Quinn, the Director of Campaigns, at the League Against Cruel Sports told us this:

No one has yet come forward to claim the trackers and there is no evidence to suggest who is responsible.

There are also a number of organised hunt saboteurs who try to disrupt hunts. Emotions often run high between supporters of the hunt and those filming or trying to disrupt their activities.

In this video a Land Rover owned by hunt saboteurs is in collision with a tractor near Croydon.

Virtually every week new footage is placed online showing what is sometimes claimed to be illegal activity.