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Everything you need to know about Plymouth’s new Forder Valley Link Road

An artist's impression of the new-look Forder Valley Link Road. Credit: Plymouth City Council

Work has begun on the construction of a multi-million pound link road in north Plymouth.

The Forder Valley Link Road is a proposed one-kilometre link between William Prance Road in Derriford and the Novorossiysk Road junction, via a bridge over the Bircham Valley.

It is hoped the new route - which is due to be completed in 2021 - will unlock thousands of planned new homes along with new businesses in the area, as well as provide a less congested route from the A38.

As the path of the new route now starts to emerge, here is a roundup of everything you need to know about the scheme.

The new-look road is due to be completed in 2021. Credit: Plymouth City Council

Where is it?

The Forder Valley Link Road is a proposed one-kilometre link between William Prance Road in Derriford and the Forder Valley Road/Novorossiysk Road junction, via a bridge over the Bircham Valley.

It will be accompanied by improvements to the Forder Valley roundabout, including a longer merge from the roundabout heading north along Forder Valley Road and an extra lane heading south towards the roundabout.

When did works start?

Enabling works started on Monday 28 January 2019. The road and is expected to be completed by the winter of 2021.

Why is it being built?

By creating an additional route between the A38 and Derriford, avoiding the often heavily congested Manadon roundabout and A386 Tavistock Road, the new link road will help reduce journey times to and from key destinations such as Derriford Hospital, the University of St Mark and St John and the Plymouth Science Park.

It will also help improve bus service reliability and includes safer routes for cyclists and pedestrians.

How much will it cost?

The road is expected to cost around £49million to build, up on the initial estimate of £38million.

This is due to increases in plant, labour and materials costs - and a better understanding of the work that will be needed to build the road.

Site investigations found that bed rock in the area was lower than predicted, needing more in-fill material as construction work would have to go deeper to provide a stable foundation.

The project has also faced criticism over the hundreds of trees that are being cut down to allow for the new route.

In response, Plymouth City Council has said it will plant around 14,500 trees, which is more than 30 times the number being removed, and invest a further £1.3million in off-site works to improve wildlife habitats.

Will the public be given a chance to express their views?

A series of public information events are due to take place this week:

  • Thursday 16 May, Estover Library, Tor Bridge School, 2pm to 7pm
  • Friday 17 May, Elm Community Centre, 10am to 7pm
  • Saturday 18 May, Windsor House, Tavistock Road, 10am to 2pm