Cheltenham's lido and Bristol shipwreck added to National Heritage List 2019

A number of sites across the West Country have been added to the National Heritage List for England this year.

A shipwreck in the Bristol Channel, Cheltenham's stylish Sandford Park Lido,the Direction Stones in Somerset, and a Second World War Practice Bombing Range Indicator and Observation Post in Putsborough Sands all made the cut.

The sites are among 83 historic treasures added to the list for England this year.

Credit: Historic England Archive

Sandford Parks Lido is a 1930s lido in the Arts and Crafts style. It opened in May 1935 and survives with its filtration plant room still intact containing its original boilers and compressors, as well as fittings such as ornate turnstiles to the main entrance.

The café has winged covered terraces, showing the 1930s enthusiasm for outdoor leisure, particularly in spa resorts such as Cheltenham.

Spa resorts were popular during the inter-war years when fresh air and fitness were widely embraced by the public.

Credit: National Heritage

The remains of an Elizabethan theatre, a building used as a Monty Python set and wartime training sites are some of the other unusual heritage sites to receive protected status this year.

A vertical spinning tunnel for testing aerodynamics, two 19th century shipwrecks and a house with recently discovered 16th century wall paintings are also among the historic places which were listed or had their protection upgraded in 2019.

Government heritage agency Historic England has revealed its list of the top 21 unusual buildings and sites to have been given new or enhanced protected status this year.

K1 telephone kiosk is located in a field in West Yorkshire Credit: Historic England/PA

The sites have been drawn from more than 500 historic places which have been added to the National Heritage List for England in 2019, along with new scheduled monuments, parks and gardens and protected wrecks.

They include the remains of the Curtain playhouse, built in Shoreditch in 1577 and where Romeo and Juliet was staged during Shakespeare’s lifetime, which was discovered in recent excavations.

The Porchester Centre in Bayswater, London, where the Mr Creosote sketch in Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life was filmed in 1982, has been upgraded to Grade II*.

A Second World War bombing range indicator in Devon. Credit: Historic England/PA

Read more: National Explosives Factory in Cornwall given heritage protection

First World War training trenches in Kent and Second World War practice bombing range indicator – formed of a large concrete arrow in the ground – and observation post in North Devon have also been protected this year.

An early telephone kiosk now in a field, a pedestrian tunnel for nursemaids to take children to the park avoiding a busy 19th century road and 18th century direction markers are also on the list of the top 21 unusual heritage sites highlighted.

Heritage minister Helen Whately said:

From a Tudor playhouse and First World War training trenches to shipwrecks and a Monty Python set, England is home to many historic, iconic, and sometimes quirky sites. Protecting our heritage is of huge importance so future generations can better understand all the things that have made this nation great.

Helen Whately
MOLA archaeologist Heather Knight excavated the Curtain in Shoreditch Credit: MOLA/PA

Read more: Construction of £4m Tintagel Castle bridge begins

Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England said: "A fascinating range of historic buildings and sites are added to the list each year, and 2019 is no exception."

A propped stone at one of two Bronze Age settlements on the south and western slopes of Leskernick Hill. Credit: Historic England - Sam Barnes
Aerial photograph of Leskernick South Stone Circle, Bodmin Moor, Cornwall Credit: Cornwall Council 2019

A kinetic water sculpture, a 19th century nursemaids’ tunnel and an Elizabethan playhouse are among the quirkier places to receive protection this year. By celebrating the extraordinary historic places which surround us, above and below ground, we hope to inspire in people a greater interest in our shared heritage, and a commitment to pass it on.

Duncan Wilson, Historic England

The full list is:

  • The Curtain Playhouse, Shoreditch, London

  • Former Chemist Shop, High Street, Lowestoft, Suffolk

  • Vertical Spinning Tunnel, Former High Speed Laboratory Complex, Twinwoods Business Park, Milton Ernest, Bedfordshire

  • Piazza Fountain, Beetham Plaza, Liverpool

  • Second World War Practice Bombing Range Indicator and Observation Post, Putsborough Sands, North Devon

  • Sandford Parks Lido, Keynsham Road, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

  • Porchester Centre, Queensway, Bayswater, London

  • The Seagull Shipwreck, Off Horsey Gap, Norfolk

  • The Xanthe Shipwreck, Off Horsey Gap, Norfolk

  • Nursemaids’ Tunnel, Regent’s Park, London

  • The Pearl Centre, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire

  • Birmingham Children's Hospital, Steelhouse Lane, Birmingham

  • Cabmen's Shelter, Northumberland Avenue at the Junction with Embankment Place, London

  • Church House Farm, Wellington, Herefordshire

  • K1 Telephone Kiosk, Newsholme Dean, near Keighley, West Yorkshire

  • First World War Practice Trenches, Tolsford Hill, Saltwood, Kent

  • The South Australian Shipwreck, Bristol Channel

  • The Chapel of Rest, Brompton-By-Sawdon, North Yorkshire

  • Direction Stones near Middle Chinnock, Somerset

  • Lych Gate and Coffin Rest at The Church of St Michael and All Angels, Brampton Abbotts, Herefordshire

  • Fountains in Promenade Gardens, St Anne’s-on-Sea, Lancashire

Read more: Shakespeare playhouse, shipwrecks and a telephone kiosk among 21 unusual but historic sites gaining protection