A veteran cinematographer from Devon swept aside the competition in Los Angeles to pick up the second Oscar of his glittering career.

Roger Deakins, 70, was the man behind the camera in the World War 1 epic drama, 1917.

The film directed by fellow Briton, Sam Mendes, has wowed audiences with its up-close-and-personal style, using a variety of techniques to intimately follow the lead characters on a journey through no man's land and into the battle front.

Thank you Sam Mendes for the most wonderful experience. Thank you, we'll never forget it.

Roger Deakins

Deakins, who grew up in Torquay and lives in Kingswear, also collected a corresponding BAFTA last week (February 2).

His previous success at the Academy Awards came in 2018 for Blade Runner 2049 - some 24 years since he was first nominated for The Shawshank Redemption.

In total, Deakins has now amassed 15 Oscar nominations for Best Cinematography and put 5 BAFTA statues on his mantlepiece.

Take a look at Roger Deakins' work on 1917:

Deakins received his golden statue from Hollywood A-lister Julie Louis-Dreyfus and Will Ferrell and posed for photographers on the red carpet after the ceremony concluded.

Roger that! Deakins poses on the red carpet with actors Julie Louis-Dreyfus and Will Ferrell. Credit: PA