New details emerge of one woman's occupation struggle

Julia Brichta came to Guernsey in 1939, one year before the arrival of German forces. Credit: Frank Falla Archive

Previously unpublished documents from the Imperial War Museum have prompted new research into the story of a Hungarian Jewish refugee - who was living in Guernsey at the start of the Occupation.

Historian and archaeologist, Dr Gilly Carr has spent more than a decade studying the Channel Islands.

She recently turned her attention to the story of Julia Brichta. 

Julia Brichta came to Guernsey in 1939, one year before the arrival of German forces.

After being taken to Ravensbrück, a concentration camp for women in Germany, she became a camp police officer.

There was doubt surrounding the story, with some historians claiming she could not be believed.

However, the new documents and Dr Carr's research suggests she was telling the truth all along.

The story of what happened to her during the war, when she was sent to Ravensbrück concentration camp, was extensively given in her own words on a number of occasions between 1945 and 1965, yet the truth of what led her to Ravensbrück, where she became a camp policewoman (a perpetrator role), has been unclear before now.

Dr Gilly Carr

  • Emma Baker caught up with the University of Cambridge’s Dr Gilly Carr:

More details on Dr Carr’s research can be found on her website.