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'Responsibility should be taken' - father's dismay after tree destroys family home

A family of five from Crawley in Sussex has been left homeless after a ten tonne tree toppled onto the roof destroying much of their house.

The mature oak, in full leaf, collapsed without warning despite regular inspections by the council. No-one was injured but as Andy Dickenson reports it could have been a very different story.

He speaks to the householder Imkiaz Najam and his neighbours Vera King and Mahomad Ibrahim.

Call for volunteers to help save Earth from solar storms

Do you have what it takes to become a storm watcher? Credit: University of Reading

Space enthusiasts are invited to become scientists to help identify massive solar eruptions by watching video clips recorded in space.

Scientists from the University of Reading are asking members of the public to help review NASA footage in the latest Solar Stormwatch project.

The project, hosted by Zooniverse, launches on 20 September and asks volunteers to review footage of eruptions on the sun’s surface.

Each eruption was made up of a billion tonnes of matter travelling at a million miles per hour.

These solar storms are capable of damaging satellites, overloading power grids and exposing astronauts to cancer-causing radiation.

Hundreds of volunteers assisted in the first Solar Stormwatch project in 2010, leading to seven scientific publications.

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Plea for more organ donors - 'families need to talk'

Her son's organs were used to save lives after he was killed in a road crash - now she's making an impassioned plea for more people to sign the transplant register.

Ali Reynolds, from Bexhill, is backing the national Organ Donation Week which started today.

Statistics show that in the last ten years 675 people in the South East have died while waiting for a transplant.

80% of us support organ donation but fewer than half have ever talked about it.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to Ali as well as specialist nurse James Broughton.

Inventor uses implanted microchip to start car

The Hampshire inventor has implanted the microchip in his hand Credit: ITV Meridian

An inventor from Hampshire has created a tiny microchip inserted into his hand, that's only the size of a grain of rice, to start his car and open his office door.

Steven Northam just waves his hand over a sensor to operate daily tasks and is now offering the service to others for the first time.

As Chloe Oliver reports.

Chloe spoke to Steven Northam, entrepreneur and inventor and Dr Geoff Watson, Anesthetic Consultant.

Rare pre-historic rhino tooth found on Isle of Wight

A teenage fossil hunter has discovered the tooth from a rare prehistoric rhinoceros that roamed the Isle of Wight 35-40 million years ago.

The tooth of the rhino-like Ronzotherium washed up on the beach on the coast near Yarmouth, in the north west of the island after being entombed in clay for million of years.

Theo Vickers, 18,was out fossil hunting when he came across the Rhino molar and knew straight away that he'd found something very special.

Ronzotherium tooth washed up on Isle of Wight Credit: Dinosaur Isle Museum

I knew straight away it was a species of rhinoceros, and after researching it further online I contacted Dinosaur Isle Museum. Finds of primitive rhinos like Ronzotherium are really rare.

It’s strange to think that such an iconic animal that people would usually associate with the African savannah, was actually evolving here, on the Isle of Wight, 35 million years ago.

– Theo Vickers

The clays where the fossil was found were laid down in a sub-tropical swampy floodplain similar to the Florida Everglades that covered the area which is now the Solent.

There have only been a handful of these teeth found in the UK and and they are all at the Natural history Museum and date from the 19th century.

This is the first one that has been found in may years and the first in our collection which dates from 1820.

It dates from the Oligiocene period when the world was changing dramatically and the Northern hemisphere was cooling.

There was extensive swamp over the area we now know as the Solent, and at this point in our history the UK was connected to mainland Europe. Other teeth and bones have been found in France.

The tooth had only been out of the clays for a few days it was washed out of eroded clay but is still very shiny. I think it is important the tooth stays on the Island and it will be looked at by a specialist and hopefully will add to our knowledge.

– Dinosaur Isle Museum curator, Dr Martin Munt

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Beekeepers try to take the sting out of falling numbers of vital wildlife

Few creatures are more vital to our survival than bees - pollinating the world's fruit and vegetable crops.

Yet in recent years their numbers have fallen alarmingly which makes a traditional market that takes place every year in Sussex all the more important.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to beekeepers Jonathan Cootae and Brian Hopper, as well as president of Sussex Beekeepers Association, Amanda Millar.

All aboard the nation's first 'solar powered buses'

It's a first not just for Brighton, but for the country. Two electric buses - powered by solar energy - have arrived in the city and are about to pick up passengers day and night.

They're completely carbon neutral and they hope to lead the charge in a revolution in sustainable transport.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to Norman Baker, Tom Druitt and Julia Fry.

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